Re: A Musicology of Ea/Cm


Subject: Re: A Musicology of Ea/Cm
From: KEVIN AUSTIN (KAUSTIN@vax2.concordia.ca)
Date: Fri Oct 15 1999 - 07:32:30 EDT


...

> However, this was a private term. At the >early days of musique
>concrete, musique concrete was publicly known as >*recherche de bruits*.
>It was probably only after the success of the >first >"musique concrete"
>broadcast, called *concert de bruits* (and not >*concert >de musique
>concrete*), on Tuesday, 5 October 1948 (if my memory serves >me well),
>that musique concrete started becoming publicly known as such.

Which may place Russolo and Cage as the parents of ea -- musique concrete
being one realization of the Art of Noises.

>If Schaeffer is to be believed (Pierret, *Entretiens avec Pierre
>Schaeffer*, 1969, >p. 52), the term *électroacoustic* was propunded by
himself.

Electroacoustic was an electrical engineering term in the early 30s. It
appears on a Decca recording of BBC Sound Effects works in the early 50s.

>"Et quand, par la suite, j'ai voulu éviter l'équivoque, je n'ai pas
>réussi à lancer >l'appelation 'électroacoustique' qui n'est pas
>engageante il est vrai. >Tout le >monde dit électronique... ce qui est
>impropre."

And there is Joel Chadabe's proposition of Electric Sound (including the
punning aspects of this term). Cahill created electric music where the
electricity was not a medium to carry information to be decoded (which
would have made it electronic), but the electricity was the message. (not
well put ... sorry).

>Because, as you may have heard, Stockhausen blended samples and
>electronicsounds in 1956 in *Gesange*, as Henry did in the same year in
>*Haut voltage*, >and as Berio did in 1958 in *Thema*, and the dichotomy
>elektronische/concrète >no longer held, hence a new designation was
needed.

My sources list Gesang as 55/56 (or is this historical revisionism?). And
Varese. Are there any electronic components in the _original_ tape part
of Deserts? (1954!) Does anyone have dates on when John Cage was doing
this crossover (40s perhaps?).

>You can always do something interesting with old cliches.

My preference is for newly invented cliches.

Best

Kevin
kaustin@vax2.concordia.ca



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