Re: A Musicology of Ea/Cm


Subject: Re: A Musicology of Ea/Cm
From: Leigh Landy (llandy@tesco.net)
Date: Tue Oct 12 1999 - 14:52:47 EDT


Triangulation is a term taken from action research models calling for
evaluation from others than, say, composers and performers in s musical
context.

The computer music remark concerns the use of computer as (co-)composer as
well as sound provider. Electroacoustic music deals with the second which
may include the first, but not necessarily of course.

Leigh Landy

----------
>From: KEVIN AUSTIN <KAUSTIN@vax2.concordia.ca>
>To: cecdiscuss@concordia.ca
>Subject: Re: A Musicology of Ea/Cm
>Date: Tue, Oct 12, 1999, 13:11
>

> Carlos
>
> Thank you for reply and clarification.
>
>
>>Professor Leigh Landy is publishing or has published an article titled
>>'Reviewing the Musicology of Electroacoustic Music: a Plea for
>>Greater Triangulation' in *Organised Sound* 4 (1).
>
> Triangulation? I understand the concept for the location of a 'point
> source' ... could you explain the concept a little further?
>
>
>>The subject will be the highlight of the Seventh Brazilian Symposium on
>>Computer Music, which will be happening in Curitiba, the capital of the
>>Parana state, between 17 and 20 July 2000. (Preliminary call to follow
>>later this week).
>
> This is indeed good news!
>
>
>>In his article, Landy reviews the musicology of EA music --- 'any music
>>in which electricity has had some involvement in sound registration and/or
>>production other than that of simple microphone recording or amplification'
>
>
> Hmmmm... an interesting set of restrictions. This would appear to remove
> my soundscape pieces and many years of work with a phono cartridge (sorry
> for the generational reference). Interesting that the word 'music'
> appears, but remains undefined (unless, as Ives it reported to have
> considered ... "Music is what remains when the sound is gone." But it's
> good to know that it includes the entire output of Glenn Gould.
>
>
>>--- according to the traditional division of the discipline: historical
>>musicology, systematic musicology and ethnomusicology, plus critical
>>musicology.
>
> The issue may be raised as to whether the application of (and extended
> version) is Adler's 1885 division is applicable ... or is the
> triangluation that is being looked into? When a web copy appears, it may
> be easier to comment.
>
>
>
>>In my view, the musicology of EA music, like EA music itself, at least in
>>its concrete orientation, is a patchwork, a bricolage. In other words, the
>>musicological. Text reflects the musical Text, in the Barthesian sense.
>
> Sir, you have the advantage. (Roland Barthes 1915-1980?)
>
> Is reference to concrete a reference to manifestation or the school of
> using a microphone. Sadly, for my poor mind, the context does not clarify.
>
> Is there a 'text' for all ea/cm? And if the sonic object (sic) is the
> text, is the word 'text' not a poor choice of words?
>
>
>>Please note that I'm not speaking about computer music here.
>
> Could you clarify a little? 'Computer Music' would include, in my use of
> the word(s), DAT, CD and the web. Myself, I would find it difficult to
> talk about ea/cm, even in Adler's first exposition of (1) Historical and
> (2) Systematic, without noting the impact of 'digital' applications, both
> in direct application to the 'sound object', and on the impact in
> reducing the significance of the 'local practice'.
>
> Adler may have wished to create another set of guidelines in the
> communications world of the 1990s. McLuhan (and Gould) did.
>
>
>> As such, it
>>certainly results from analogue recording procedures, as the musicological
>>text today results from select-copy-and-paste procedures. However, it might
>>be useful to ask to what extent such procedures, in general, result from a
>>certain worldview.
>
>
> Sorry again ... the word analog is this the physical/ acoustical act of
> transducing sound waves, or the composers 'analogical mind' that produces
> as set of relationships between an idea and its representation?
>
>
>>Carlos
>>Palombini@usa.net
>>
>>PS: pardon my ignorance, but what is 'photoshop music'?
>
>
> Probably worth a conference in itself! Photoshop Music is a term that I
> have stolen from somewhere in reference to ways of approaching
> sound/music composition, creation - collage - montage.
>
> Almost everyone in the [digital] visual arts has used photoshop, or some
> equivalent (bit mapped) "graphics" program. It is possible to scan
> (record), import, edit, apply a plug-in (process) and assemble images,
> without having held a camera, or even seen the abject(s) in 3-D.
>
> Sonic arts have now reached the stage where anyone can collect and
> manipulate sound. I view this as a very healthy development. I also feel
> that there are opportunities presented here for the education and
> development of the inner and outer ears.
>
> One of the differences from "music"ology, from ea/cm could be that the
> ea/cm-ologist would have in her bag of tricks, a thorough knowledge (and
> understanding) of acoustics and psychoacoustics. How many 'musicologists'
> think that brass instruments play the harmonic series? [Any book on
> acoustics will explain that a pipe closed at one end can only produce
> odd-numbered partials.]
>
> Looking forward to a continuation of this important and significant
> discussion ... must rush ...
>
> Many many thanks for your insightful comments.
>
>
> Best
>
> Kevin
> kaustin@vax2.concordia.ca
>
>
>
> Still early fall, but the momentary chill winds warn the leaves that,
> like the Canada geese V-ing in the corn-field stubble, it is soon time to
> return mother earth to her Persephonous-less plight.
>
>
>
>
>



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