Re: Mixing it...


Subject: Re: Mixing it...
From: KEVIN AUSTIN (KAUSTIN@vax2.concordia.ca)
Date: Mon May 24 1999 - 07:05:29 EDT


I guess it all depends upon where you stand ....

In 1976, a group of about 12 of us decided to soundscape a train. We set
up three locations along a track and decided to do the 23:00 (11 pm) train
from Montreal to a suburb, Hudson. It was October. The train runs next to
a large lake at the convergence of the Ottawa and St Lawrence Rivers. It
was about 10 degrees.

At the Hudson train station we set up a number of microphones and a
couple of tape recorders. We had been told that since the train passed
over several roads on the way, we would hear the train horn from a
distance. We were not prepared for what happened.

About 6 minutes before the train arrived, we heard the first, very distant
whistle, followed by, what appeared to be a very faint echo. It appeared
to be continuously descending in pitch. Shortly after (since the train was
approaching), the horn sounded again, this time with a longer echo, and a
very clear echo, with the pitch slowly descending. A third time, the horn
sounded, closer yet, the echo lasted more than ten seconds, with a
descending pitch shift throughout.

[snip]

About 1 minute after the train left the station, the horn blew again --
with echo. This time, the glissando on the horn was ascending.

It took a couple of days to think this one out. It was ... but that would
be giving it away ... any solutions?

Best

Kevin
kaustin@vax2.concordia.ca

The two most important rules in life are:
    (1) Don't tell everything you know

overcast, still



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