Re: On illegal software in an academic assignment ...


Subject: Re: On illegal software in an academic assignment ...
From: mike mcferron (mike@bigcomposer.com)
Date: Sat Nov 12 2005 - 22:25:22 EST


This is probably the biggest issue facing us today. I don't think
it's as big of a monetary issue as most companies want us to believe,
but an ethical issue. It's an attitude that devalues intellectual
property. As an example, the argument against iTunes downloads and
AAC formats is a perfect demonstration of the argument. A recent
article from the editor of Macworld magazine complained about the
restrictions of the AAC format. He was upset that he couldn't copy
"his" music and that new laws were going to prohibit him more. On
the Macworld discussion board, a grandfather was upset with Disney
for not releasing Cinderella (or something like that) on DVD. He
felt no remorse for copying Cinderella from a VHS his neighbor had
loaned him -- he felt it was his right to be able to show Cinderella
to his grandchild because it was such a wonderful film.

I agree with you Kevin -- this is like plagiarism, and students who
use pirated software should face the same consequences as the
students who purchase papers online. Unfortunately, most people see
this as a victimless crime because so many people do it. I am
saddened that people will find a way to justify anything as long as
it benefits them--in this case pure theft.

M

PS)mmm.. a cigarette sounds good about now. I better go outside in
case my mom calls while i'm smoking.
*********************************
Mike McFerron

www.bigcomposer.com
www.redearthpublishing.com

On Nov 12, 2005, at 9:07 PM, Kevin Austin wrote:

> Any comments on this? academic, student, interested by-stander,
> software developer ... etc
>
> The names have been changed for reasons that may become clear.
>
> Best
> Kevin
>
> ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
>
>> Quoting knowthyself@gmailed.com:
>>
>> Yo HI!! I'm looking for "free"(ed) stuff. Not that I have it. But
>> I think the freeing of "stuff" is a really good idea. Emancipate
>> stuff!
>
>
>> On 19/14/11, wrote: kru_k2@yahooed.com
>>
>> You mean like: MAX.................... and
>> M..................S............P....................
>
>
> At 17:69 PM -0500 10/13/09, kru_k2@yahooed.com wrote:
>
>> Simple!! To start, you could 'borrow' / liberate 'stuff' from the
>> internet really easily. (Victimless crime since it's so widespread.)
>>
>> Quoting someone else <notthatyou know@gmail.com>:
>> > Hey hey ... you can 'lend' me a liberated copy of MAX? One that
>> "won't expire"?
>
> +++++++++++++++++++++++
>
> Sorry. I don't get it. Why act like seven year olds smoking
> cigarettes behind the garage? Call it theft and get on with it.
> Sheesh!
>
> Try it like this:
>
> "I'm looking to steal a copy of MAX/MSP so I can use it in my next
> class assignment. I will declare it to be an illegal copy and
> accept the consequences defined by the University Code of Conduct."
>
> (I think that use of stolen property would be somewhat equivalent
> to plagiarism, and that's a pretty clear situation, but maybe the
> instructor will look the other way. After all, you did say that you
> wanted to be a software developer ... )
>
> Best
>
> Kevin
>
>
>
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>
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