Re: traduction/translation


Subject: Re: traduction/translation
From: Eliot Handelman (eliot@generation.net)
Date: Wed Oct 26 2005 - 10:17:45 EDT


The term almost certainly originates in
Edmund Husserl's "phenomenological reduction." I don't
know what Schaeffer's intellectual props were but it
would be rather amazing if he'd never studied Merleau-Ponty
(phenomenology of perception, etc.) this having been
exceedingly fashionable in his day.

-- eliot

Louis Dufort wrote:

>Isn't not "Easy Listening"? ;-)
>
>Sorry folks this was too easy and I'm in a corny mood (to much rain in
>MTL)...
>
>
>le 10/25/05 8:07 PM, Kevin Austin à kevin.austin@videotron.ca a écrit :
>
>
>
>>Many, among them: reduced hearing, reduced listening, naive hearing /
>>listening (see also
>>http://www.ears.dmu.ac.uk/rubrique.php3?id_rubrique=204 )
>>
>>You may (or may not) find the definition / translation proposed to be
>>in accord with your understanding of the term in french.
>>
>>Best
>>
>>Kevin
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>At 19:49 -0400 2005/10/25, Chantale Laplante wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Quelqu'un -quelqu'une saurait-il
>>>la traduction en anglais de écoute réduite
>>>(Anyone could suggest a translation?)
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>Thanks
>>>
>>>Chantale Laplante
>>>
>>>
>>
>>The Ears article says, in part:
>>
>>In Schaefferian theory, reduced listening is the attitude which
>>consists in listening to the sound for its own sake, as a sound
>>object by removing its real or supposed source and the meaning it may
>>convey.
>>
>>... In reduced listening our listening intention targets the event
>>which the sound object is itself (and not to which it refers) and the
>>values which it carries in itself (and not the ones it suggests).
>>
>>... Reduced listening is therefore an "anti-natural" process, which
>>goes against all conditioning. The act of removing all our habitual
>>references in listening is a voluntary and artificial act which
>>allows us to clarify many phenomena implicit in our perception.
>>
>>Thus, the name reduced listening refers to the notion of
>>phenomenological reduction (Époché), because it consists to some
>>extent of stripping the perception of sound of everything that is not
>>"it itself" in order to hear only the sound, in its materiality, its
>>substance, its perceivable dimensions.
>>
>>Reduced listening and the sound object are thus correlates of each
>>other; they define each other mutually and respectively as perceptual
>>activity and object of perception.
>>
>>
>>For me, there are a number of fundamental problems with the original
>>concept, but it is, as stated, a theory.
>>
>>
>>
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