Re: Intuitive EA Proformance Practice Research


Subject: Re: Intuitive EA Proformance Practice Research
From: Rick (ricknance@gmail.com)
Date: Thu Oct 13 2005 - 10:19:36 EDT


A far as a "pure" generalised controller, probably muscle wire would
figure in. It shrinks when you apply current to it. You could use
anything from bundles to individual wire depending on the sensitivity
needed. Which makes me wonder why I haven't seen the stuff in Computer
Music Journal yet. It's been around forever.

You direct the audible signal back into the wire in order to change
the behavior of the instrument. That way the ears and the muscles have
a direct feed and the loop is "complete". After that, pick your
parameters.

R

On 10/13/05, Morgan Sutherland <skiptracer@gmail.com> wrote:
> I wonder how you'd go about this.... rumble packs from video game
> controllers perhaps? Or maybe actual physical instrument like
> bodies... actual strings and hollow chamb ers.
>
> On 10/13/05, Rick <ricknance@gmail.com> wrote:
> > Controller devices, usually MIDI, lack physical feedback between the
> > sound the instrument is making and body that's trying to make it.
> >
> > When a trumpet player shifts across octaves, volume or noise ranges,
> > the trumpet feeds back into the performer not only through the ears,
> > but through the inherent and consisitent features of the "interface"
> > itself. It takes very specific types of effort across the whole body
> > to do things to the sound. By constricting the air flow by half
> > valving, you increase the back pressure felt by the diaphram and
> > mouth.
> >
> > Violinists not only hear the tremolo, but they feel the string. The
> > tension of the string changes according to the place it is on the
> > fingerboard. The bow transmits the tension of the string (or bridge)
> > back to the performer. All of these things tie the ear together with
> > the instrument. The fingers, lips, arms, torso and everything else
> > control the sound according to the dictates of the ear.
> >
> > just makes sure your controller can do that. Can't be that hard these days.
> >
> > r
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > On 10/13/05, Ryan Supak <ryansupak@gmail.com> wrote:
> > > I'd just try to remember that a lot of the most enjoyable interfaces, in
> > > general, are ones that don't make the mind "shift gears" a lot mid-use, and
> > > they allow for "emergent strategies" -- in other words, a person can develop
> > > his/her own way of playing the thing that will work; they're not limited to
> > > how the designer thought it should be played.
> > >
> > > I can't prove it, but I think there's a connection between simple "rule
> > > sets" and emergent strategies.
> > >
> > > I've played the "cook up the best interface" game a lot, and in the end I
> > > wound up with an 88-key piano keyboard. It is highly refined, capable of a
> > > wide bandwidth of simultaneous control, and it's easy to find your place on
> > > it by touch alone.
> > >
> > > $0.01,
> > > rs
> > >
> >
> >
> > --
> > ======================
> > Rick Nance
> > De Montfort University
> > Leicester, UK
> > RickNance.org
> >
> >
>
>

--
======================
Rick Nance
De Montfort University
Leicester, UK
RickNance.org



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