Re: physical modeling and the real


Subject: Re: physical modeling and the real
From: Rick (ricknance@gmail.com)
Date: Sat Sep 17 2005 - 13:12:02 EDT


ooohoo! cool. Ensemble Modem? Barely a pixel from having to change the
name! Is this a regular gigging group?

So the synthesis is controlled through the mouse/keyboard, playing
through the handheld speaker, mixed with the guitar which feeds back?
Is that right?

r

On 9/17/05, Van Richard Stiefel, Dr <van.stiefel@mcgill.ca> wrote:
> Sorry, this clip...
>
> http://silvertone.princeton.edu/%7Evan/showl_ensemble_modem.mov
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: owner-cec-conference@concordia.ca on behalf of Rick
> Sent: Sat 9/17/2005 8:26 AM
> To: cec-conference@concordia.ca
> Subject: physical modeling and the real
>
> It seems to me, that physical modeling would be put to good (or
> better) use attempting to design new instruments, not necessarily
> synthesized, that had wider ranges of sound available to them. Horns
> with white noise valves, finger triggered mutes (with tremolo!),
> strategically placed pickups on strings (pickups inside strings),
> resonant chorus of strings on double-reed instruments; whatever.
>
> Use all those things like parameters for lacquer, wood density, string
> alloys, and so on to build instruments that can approach the
> requirements of the modern composer whether EA or written/acoustic.
> Violins do pretty well already, but L. Shankar's 10 string acoustic
> electric with full orchestra range and resonators is one example of
> something new. Although I doubt there was any physical modeling going
> on in the design.
>
> r
>
> On 9/17/05, Richard Wentk <richard@skydancer.com> wrote:
> > At 23:55 16/09/2005, you wrote:
> > >Well, if they made it correctly, you would be able to adjust
> > >parameters which would allow you to MAKE it a good piano, or not. If
> > >it only had one sound, what's the point? Well... there is one, but, it
> > >would be vastly more useful if there were parameters.
> >
> > I think you'd have to have so many parameters - right down to the
> > metallurgical characteristics of the alloys used in the frame and strings,
> > and the physical properties of the case and soundboard, including the
> > layers of lacquer - that you could spend forever tweaking everything trying
> > to get the perfect sound.
> >
> > And then you have the problem of how to diffuse it. A piano is not a point
> > source, and a stereo simulation will lose a lot of relevant information.
> > Speakers are always the weak link in the chain, and only become tolerably
> > realistic if you have a five or six figure budget. Which means instead of
> > trundling around a big flat harp on a truck you have to trundle around a
> > huge speaker set instead. Oh well. :-)
> >
> > Meanwhile at the other extreme today's sampled pianos seem good enough for
> > recording anything that isn't a commercial solo classical performance.
> >
> > Richard
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
>
> --
> ======================
> Rick Nance
> De Montfort University
> Leicester, UK
> RickNance.org
>
>
>

-- 
======================
Rick Nance
De Montfort University
Leicester, UK
RickNance.org



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