Re: Le mat?riau Sonore, hidden place


Subject: Re: Le mat?riau Sonore, hidden place
From: Morgan Sutherland (skiptracer@gmail.com)
Date: Thu Sep 15 2005 - 23:11:04 EDT


How so? In the realm of synthesis and processing? Or psychoacoustics?
Do we need more synthesis techniques, more deeply modeled ones? Detail
or new ideas?

On 9/15/05, Michael Gogins <gogins@pipeline.com> wrote:
> We KNOW that we can get computers to make all those cool soundes Shane Turner describes -- it's a conseqauence of the Church-Turing thesis and the finite bandwidth and resolution of the ear.
>
> Only we don't know how to program the computer to make them -- yet.
>
> Learning this stuff is really where it's at with computer music.
>
> That, and understanding how to get the computer to work directly with musical semantics, compositional structures, as we are just beginning to do with sounds.
>
> We won't use the computer to its potential until we know a LOT more about music and music theory -- a lot lot more.
>
> Regards,
> Mike
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Shane Turner <shane.turner@sympatico.ca>
> Sent: Sep 15, 2005 8:50 PM
> To: cec-conference@concordia.ca
> Subject: Re: Le mat?riau Sonore, hidden place
>
> I guess this is more of a response to both Ned and Morgan's posts.
>
> While it is true that a computer can create a lot of different sounds, there
> are certain things it just cannot create, at least in my opinion. I've been
> strictly a computer musician for a long time but the past couple of years,
> thanks to hanging out with a few friends, I started really experimenting
> with acoustic instruments and this for me opened up a whole different world
> I had been missing out on.
>
> Take a piano, it is amazing the sheer variety of timbres and sounds you can
> get out of it if you explore a bit. Prepared piano (which in itself can
> create an amazing wealth of different sounds), this is only the beginning.
> You want noise, try scraping the coils, etc. Want strange tones, try bowing
> the strings, and go for the points that create overtones, etc. The richness
> of the sound is incredible, and always varied and different. While I love
> tinkering around with computer software, the immediacy and hands-on feel of
> a live instrument is also hard to beat.
>
> Be the first on your block to surprise your friends with unusual sounds they
> can't duplicate in software. Experiment with an acoustic instrument Today.
>
> --shane
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Morgan Sutherland" <skiptracer@gmail.com>
> To: <cec-conference@concordia.ca>
> Sent: Thursday, September 15, 2005 8:08 PM
> Subject: Re: Le mat?riau Sonore, hidden place
>
>
> >I don't think you would disagree that a computer has a much broader
> > pallet of sound then ANY instrument.
> >
> > On 9/15/05, Ned Bouhalassa <ned@nedfx.com> wrote:
> >> A sampler/cd/turntable/cassette deck can make any noise in existence,
> >> but only because it _records_ other sounds. If you're talking about
> >> synthesized sound, then I disagree. I've yet to hear any
> >> computer-synthesized sound that comes close to the richness of timbre
> >> of most acoustic instruments and sounds in general. I believe it has to
> >> do with the natural chaos of transient material and unpredictability of
> >> partials over time occuring in a natural setting, but... I'm in over my
> >> head. You guys and gals will surely correct my pop acoustics.
> >>
> >> Ned
> >>
> >> On 15-Sep-05, at 7:19 PM, Morgan Sutherland wrote:
> >>
> >> > The computer can make virtually any noise in
> >> > existence while an acoustic instrument is confined to a narrowband of
> >> > timbre, however with many many possibilities within those limits.
> >>
> >> w w w . n e d f x . c o m
> >> ??????????????????
> >> Ned Bouhalassa
> >> ??????????????????
> >> n e d @ n e d f x . c o m
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
>
>
>
>
>
>



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