Re: what was that?


Subject: Re: what was that?
From: sylvi macCormac (macCormac@shaw.ca)
Date: Tue Aug 16 2005 - 13:23:46 EDT


dear Larry & Madelaine et al

well said / read :-) is it time for a cup of tea / cha on line ? ;-)
iriXx, do you still have th silver tea set ... innit fab ...
meeting avec tu et tout le monde @ lake isle of innisfree ... with papers
to tell us th time.
if Joyce & Yeats met at th Coffee Shop down th street surely we can find
th space ...

well said / read that TH dis cussion / percussion /
conundrums / conference / endurance / process re art & objects
are 'not over' till we retire to th studio / home at 8:00 O'Clock ...
but with you bunch SOUNDS like your home is a studio ;-)

did i hear you say 'co(s)mic proportions ? like as in Stephen W Hawking's
'A Brief History of Time'

ps i should clarify my note - that not all ElectroAcoustic Compositions
are Train Wrecks with Junctures / Shunting with or without Doors /
Passages
Some EA is ' Music that SOUNDS like th Weather' &btw, 'Heard any good
movies lately ?' (martin gotfrit.sfu.ca). YO !!! see SONUS ....

best, macCormac
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
http://www.sylvi.ca
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
'if i were a train wreck
i'd fall in love with you'
(sylvi.2006.socan.ca)

Kevin Austin wrote:

> Perhaps there are some things in life which are not gender-related. ?
>
> Some questions bring forward matters of co(s)mic proportions, and
> if'n it takes a few more whirls of the globe to figger out the
> question, is there a gender-related issue here?
>
> Some of my oft' used words to questions are ... "Wait!", "Slow down",
> "Stop", and "Please, not so fast."
>
> In my classes I have the expectation that questions are not 'reflex'
> actions, but are brought because there has been an impasse reached in
> research. Consider the on-going discussion about 'art' and 'objects'
> in ea ... This discussion is not "over", but rather there is time
> needed to allow the percolation of ideas through the multiple levels
> of filters to help sort out the ideas and issues.
>
> This is well-known in teaching mixed-gender classes. Males in general
> react in different ways and on different time scale than females. In
> a classroom, it is not usual to have the first question, or the first
> answer brought by a female. There is often a greater 'reflection' and
> 'assessment', before a voice is sounded.
>
> But this does not always hold for situations where the issue is not
> of a scholarly or technical nature.
>
> If it took Marcel and Jimmy 9 years to write about Losing Time and
> Finding Ulysses, I have no difficulty spending 15 years searching
> through each before drawing conclusions or passing opinion, although
> it does seem that Marcel was enlightened (of 2.5 million words) by
> slipping in the gutter in Book VII.
>
> Both Durrell and Stoppard write nice things about Joyce, although
> Durrell is a little less complimentary towards Marcel ... perhaps too
> close to the chalky-pastel of the prose.
>
> Time for tea? (with a madeleine) What time is it Marcel? Eight
> o'clock!! I have it written down on this bit of paper.
>
> Montreal has cooled to a wonderful sunny 29.
>
> Best
>
> Kevin
>
> At 07:53 -0600 2005/08/16, sylvi macCormac wrote:
> >do i hear Turf Wars / Fluff Wars ?
> >
> >Neither would it explain why wo/men don't pay attention
> >to what dis abled folks write in e-mail and scholarly and technical
> >articles. :>)
> >
> >more ramps NOW ! ! ! :-) Stairs are Passé ;-)
> >
> >in vests we trust, sylvi macCormac
> >~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> >http://www.sylvi.ca / na / da / bc
> >siwash rock & soundscape composiiong
> >~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> >practising for th paralympic down hill wheel chair race :-)
> >
> >
> >James Phelps wrote:
> >
> >> Neither would it explain why women don't pay attention
> > > to what men write in e-mail and scholarly and technical
> > > articles. :>)
> >>
> >> -Jim Phelps
> >>
> >> --- Linda Seltzer <lseltzer@alumni.caltech.edu> wrote:
> >>
> >> > >> >
> >> > >> > Sat Aug 6, 7:29 PM ET
> >> > >> >
> >> > >> > LONDON (AFP) - Men who are accused of never
> > > > listening by women now have an excuse -- women's voices
> > > > are more difficult for men to listen to than other
> > > > men's, a report said.
> > > >
> >> > This doesn't explain why men don't pay attention to
> > > > what women write in e-mail and scholarly and technical articles.
> > > >
> > > > Linda Seltzer



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