Re: Rhythmic Speech


Subject: Re: Rhythmic Speech
From: nick storring (nickstorring@hotmail.com)
Date: Sun Jul 10 2005 - 02:41:38 EDT


Isn't that Paul Lansky that did "Idle Chatter"?

Agreed about the hip hop/ turntablism, electronica angle too... Check out Prefuse73's first record (Vocal Studies and Uprock Narratives for that)

Nick




please visit my new website http://www.nickstorring.com/




>From: Phil Thomson <hellomynameisphil@gmail.com>
>Reply-To: cec-conference@concordia.ca
>To: cec-conference@concordia.ca
>Subject: Re: Rhythmic Speech
>Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2005 23:33:37 -0700
>
>Charles Amirkhanian, "Just" (you know, the one that goes "Rainbow Chug
>Bandit Bomb," etc.) Other of his work may be helpful too. There are
>some free streams at www.radiom.org.
>
>Larry Polansky's "Idle Chatter" series.
>
>Depending on the scope of your paper, you could think about connecting
>with hip-hop, rap and sampled speech/song in electronic pop music. In
>recent ea, there may arguably be some (unacknowledged? unconscious?)
>borrowing from these traditions.
>
>PT
>
>
>
>On 7/9/05, Chris Leon <chrisleon@videotron.ca> wrote:
> > Hi,
> >
> > I am writing a paper on the use of spoken word as rhythmic device for
> > composition. This involves any sound emitted by the voice (male or
> > female) that is morphed into a rhythmic pattern.
> >
> > Who are the first composers to take speech fragments and create
> > rhythmic patterns or loops?
> >
> > Some of the early pioneers I have found so far are Steve Reich and Leos
> > Janacek.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
>
>--
>Phil Thomson, BFA, MFA
>010100000110100001101001011011000010000001010100011010000110111101101101011100110110111101101110
>hellomynameisphil@gmail.com
>http://www.sfu.ca/~pthomson/
>



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