On popular music and ea and & ... FWD: from ACMA


Subject: On popular music and ea and & ... FWD: from ACMA
From: Kevin Austin (kevin.austin@videotron.ca)
Date: Mon May 23 2005 - 22:12:01 EDT


>Date: Tue, 24 May 2005 11:04:45 +1200 (NZST)
>From: acma-l-request@list.waikato.ac.nz
>
>Message: 1
>Date: Mon, 23 May 2005 11:04:21 +1000
>From: Tim Kreger <tkreger@bigpond.net.au>
>Subject: Re: [Acma-l] steim and improvising techno
>To: Damian Stewart <damian@frey.co.nz>
>
>
>Hi Damian,
>
>Steim is pretty cool,however they tend emphasise the use of their own
>software(nothing wrong with that). There are many things you can
>explore yourself for next to nothing. PD, Supercollider, Open Sound
>World and many more cost nothing and support odd controllers or a way
>to use HID devices meaning you can cut up game controllers (or use as
>is). One of the STEIM projects focuses on this. There are many weird
>and wonderful game controllers out there
>
>Here is my favorite one at the moment
>
>http://www.raildriver.com/
>
>(sorry Rodney, not trying start a best controller war!! :-) )
>
>I think STEIM would be an invaluable experience but I also think there
>is much you can do in your own back yard. This list has many people who
>are experts in this area.
>
>Hope this helps
>
>Tim
>
>BTW Many would say the Detroit scene started more like 30 years ago and
>I think its better to avoid the techno V art music thread on this list.
>Its been done to many times with no real result,
>
>
>On 22/05/2005, at 10:50 AM, Damian Stewart wrote:
>
>> hey everyone, apologies for the cross-post
>>
>> I wonder if anyone has any information, opinions, ideas, rants
>> relating to STEIM in The Netherlands (www.steim.nl). As well as
>> holding workshops, lectures, concerts, and having an artist's hotel,
>> they build instruments that promise to allow a much more expressive
>> interface between computers and humans - complex, delicate, and
>> sensitive devices with hundreds of sensors that fire off midi control
>> messages.
>>
>> One of my continuing interests is in taking the rudiments of techno
>> music and turning it into an improv performance. (I passionately
>> believe that techno in the experimental/Detroit senses of the word has
>> been one of the most interesting developments in electroacoustic music
>> in the last 15 years, and its relative neglect in the world of 'art'
>> and 'academic' music upsets me greatly.) At the moment I improvise
>> using a laptop and a mouse and the sounds of the environment I'm
>> performing in, but I feel I'm approaching the expressive limits of
>> having only one two-dimensional analog input (the mouse). (I could try
>> to work within those limits, I suppose, but playing with new toys is
>> potentially more fun.)
>>
>> More importantly, other musicians can have difficulty communicating
>> with me an in improv jam - I can't really look them in the eye because
>> I'm hunched over my laptop. I play crosslegged on the floor because it
>> frees up my body to move more than sitting at a desk but it's still
>> not ideal.
>>
>> As an impoverished electroacoustic music student, I'm applying for a
>> Creative New Zealand grant to get me over there for a little while on
>> a professional development trip. The grant pool is hotly competitive
>> so any help I can get would be greatly appreciated.
>>
>> love,
> > d
> > ____________________________________________________
>> Acma-l Mailing List
>> http://list.waikato.ac.nz/mailman/listinfo/acma-l
> > ACMA Web site http://www.acma.asn.au/
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 2
>Date: Mon, 23 May 2005 19:08:45 +1000
>From: Julian Knowles <julianknowles@mac.com>
>Subject: Re: [Acma-l] steim and improvising techno
>
>
>On 22/05/2005, at 10:50 AM, Damian Stewart wrote:
>
>>> One of my continuing interests is in taking the rudiments of techno
>>> music and turning it into an improv performance. (I passionately
>>> believe that techno in the experimental/Detroit senses of the word
>>> has been one of the most interesting developments in electroacoustic
>>> music in the last 15 years,
>
>agreed
>
>>> and its relative neglect in the world of 'art' and 'academic' music
>>> upsets me greatly.)
>
>i'm not sure its a conspiracy, more that there are not a lot of people
>following it on the academic scene for a range of structural reasons.
>Age is a factor, as it the difficulty some departments have in
>embracing popular music, due to a lack of staff expertise in the area,
>or their overall mission as a department/institution. It feels like it
>is incrementally changing over time, however... and there are some
>exceptions to the rule due in part to younger staff with these research
>interests getting positions in the academy. On this list you will find
>people who share your interests, so don't be put off... even if it is a
>so-called 'academic' list. I think the .microsound list might also be a
>good place to raise your thoughts, now that the relentless
>announcements and self-promo posts have been bumped off the list.
>
>For what it's worth, the popular music research community still has
>vigorous debate on this issue (it is not a new topic by any means),
>including whether we should be using the term 'popular' in the first
>place.....(as whole areas of so called popular music are quite
>unpopular and somewhat experimental) but I digress..
>
>It would be fair to say that there are increasing numbers of
>researchers emerging from the popular music musicology scene and a
>significant number of people looking at various forms of EDMC
>(Electronic Dance Music Culture) for doctoral studies. Some these
>doctorates will translate into academic appointments at some time or
>another! On a more serious note, you might be surprised, if you did a
>literature search, by how many journal articles and books have appeared
>in the last 5-10 years. Give it a whirl at http://scholar.google.com
>
>You might also want to join the new Dancecult-l list recently started
>by Graham St. John, who is a postdoctoral research fellow at the
>University of Queensland. This list has attracted some really
>interesting people and discussions so far have been very interesting.
>
>http://listcultures.org/mailman/listinfo/dancecult-l_listcultures.org
>
>On this list you will find many people from around the world who are
>engaged in EDMC as academic researchers and/or participants in some
>other respect. The list is, however, focussed on dance music culture
>and the critical aspects of it, rather than on technical aspects of
>performance/composition. Although there may be genre specific
>performance issues (ie effective controller designs for music with
>tight metrical structures etc.) many performance issues will be genre
>neutral. You could therefore use this list.
>
>Hope this helps you in your quest to find people to talk these issues
>through with!
>
>Regards
>Julian
>
>
>End of Acma-l Digest, Vol 30, Issue 11
>**************************************



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