Re: Hearing Loss sites etc


Subject: Re: Hearing Loss sites etc
From: David Mooney (moko@city-net.com)
Date: Sun May 22 2005 - 11:55:12 EDT


At the recent SEAMUS conference, they had a sound pressure
meter on top of the sound borad in one of the two concert
venues. Most composers who diffused their work at the
soundboard honored the 90dB max--some did not. The volume
level of the concerts in this hall, to my ears, was far more
under control than in the other hall. We, the composers,
have control over this. We set our own levels at the tech
rehearsals. So in these situations at least, it's on us to
set appropriate levels for our music. And, as Mike said, the
Genelec speakers provided great clarity at low levels.

Greg Eustace wrote:
>
> There are electroacoustic concerts taking placing in Montreal (and all over,
> Iím sure) that are utterly negligent in terms of the risks to the audience's
> hearing. I know I can't go to shows anymore - because in my experience there's
> a much better chance that I'm going to be exposed to such negligence when
> amplifiers are involved. Even musician's ear plugs are not enough - when being
> exposed to 100-120 db for 3 hours. Frankly, it feels like my refusal to
> endanger my hearing is going to make having a career in music all the more
> difficult.
>
> Forgive my ignorance, but what is the electroacoustic community doing to react
> against this? What do the acoustic ecologists say? Are there venues that cater
> to the safety conscious? What does Canadian law say about noise levels in
> concert situations? What can the young electroacoustians (like me) do to
> support the cause?
>
> I'm a little disheartened by it all and I would appreciate your thoughts.
>
> Quoting Kevin Austin <kevin.austin@videotron.ca>:
>
> >
> >
> > A general introduction to (mostly noise induced) hearing loss:
> >
> > http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/noise/
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > >The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)
> > >has released a useful software package for demonstrating the
> > >effects of noise-induced hearing loss. The NIOSH Hearing Loss
> > >Simulator runs on a Windows-based PC with sound capabilities, and
> > >allows the user to select different durations and levels of noise
> > >exposure while "hearing" the effects on a variety of foreground and
> > >background sounds.
> >
> > http://holmessafety.org/hlsim/
> >
> >
> >
> > Best
> >
> > Kevin
> >
>
> --

-- 
David Mooney
dmooney@city-net.com
http://www.city-net.com/~moko/



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