Re: dis-ability theory in EA


Subject: Re: dis-ability theory in EA
From: EAM (EAM@sontec.demon.co.uk)
Date: Wed Mar 09 2005 - 05:14:01 EST


In message <a05210603be50d7dac206@[70.81.93.250]>, Kevin Austin
<kevin.austin@videotron.ca> writes
>With larger desktop computers and powerful easy to use sound
>software, ea is a great creative medium for numbers of people with
>disabilities.
>
>Two primary groups I would note are those with visual disabilities
>and those with mobility disabilities (esp those who cannot leave
>their living environment).
>
>
>Do you know of projects / plans to involve disabled and non-disabled
>people in this area?
>

Sonic Arts Network is currently running a wonderful project called
'Sonic Postcards' [www.sonicpostcards.org]. Sound artists,
electroacoustic composers and the like are working in schools throughout
Britain making sonic postcards. A number of the schools involved are
special schools where the children have physical disabilities, learning
difficulties and other conditions that make it extremely difficult for
them to be in mainstream schools.

I have just completed a postcard in a special school where the kids had
all kinds of learning difficulties - brain damage from birth, varying
degrees of autism, Downs syndrome and other conditions. The project was
amazing. The kids were fantastic, full of ideas and fabulous vocabulary
(utterances, physical gestures etc) for articulating their experiences
of sound. They went out into their immediate environment, listened
intensely, recorded sounds (using an iRiver iHP-120), came back into the
classroom, edited their recordings (using ProTools Free and Audacity)
and put the sounds together. In my book, that's composing.

-- 
Robert Worby



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