Re: ea / studies / mastering


Subject: Re: ea / studies / mastering
From: David Mooney (moko@city-net.com)
Date: Sat Feb 26 2005 - 09:35:49 EST


I agree that the areas of study you mention are essential,
but question that the idea of "clarity" is a necessary
aesthetic for good ea. Sometimes muddiness, confusion and a
lack of clarity (but well mastered!) is just what's
needed--like life itself.

Kevin Austin wrote:
>
> I think that this is prime reason for the study of acoustics,
> psychoacoustics and ASA in general as central features of an
> Electroacoustics Studies curriculum.
>
> At 2:47 PM -0500 2/24/05, gogins@pipeline.com wrote:
> >[...]
> >Consequently, I think that in new styles and fields of music and sound art,
> >[...] it's generally helpful to identify principles that make what
> >one hears clearer and easier to follow... this is just a starting
> >point, clarity is hardly the only purpose of craft but it is
> >certainly a fundamental one.
>
> and follow the previous thread on mastering...
>
> http://alcor.concordia.ca/~kaustin/cecdiscuss/2003/3497.html
>
> and the originals ...
>
> http://cec.concordia.ca/econtact/Issues_in_ea/
>
> DOCUMENTS:
> The Practice of Mastering in Electroacoustics (pdf document)
> A Guide to Producing Stems (pdf document)
>
> >More recent examples of "rules" for contemporary music making would be
> >arranging recorded tracks not to overlap in critical frequency bands, or in
> >beats, and to somewhat compress the dynamic range of the recording as a
> >whole and the leading tracks in particular, thus leading to a CLEARER
> >separatiaon of the tracks. There's a certain similarity here to traditional
> >principles of orchestration....
> >
>
> Best
>
> Kevin

-- 
David Mooney
dmooney@city-net.com
http://www.city-net.com/~moko/



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