Re: A one-dimensional universe of sound


Subject: Re: A one-dimensional universe of sound
n_kondon@alcor.concordia.ca
Date: Tue Feb 15 2005 - 20:00:56 EST


Quoting Steve Layton <dalgas@speakeasy.net>:

> I'm just saying that we might be better off thinking about the "how" more
> than the "how many".

Choice in question:

How?

Like this??? option 1
Like that??? option 2
Like so????? option 3.........

"How many" possible answers of "how" are there? The answer will express a
certain degree of freedom. If the answer is "infinity", an artist such as
myslef will rejoyce, as I will then use my creativity to immagine possible ways
as to "how". If the answer is "either this way or that", one might be able to
do the math and figure out which way is best (assuming an option is better,
otherwise one could flip a coin).

> Sheer number says nothing about the quality of those choices.

20% of us people are high quality. If Zeus were to take a handfull of us, by
the power of statistics, a bigger handfull will result to more people of high
quality. It is useless to argue over this. Of course, Zeus, on his off day, may

take a huge handfull of complete idiots... The world is a crazy place.

this is fun.

nick

Quoting Steve Layton <dalgas@speakeasy.net>:

> ----- Original Message -----
> From: <n_kondon@alcor.concordia.ca>
> To: <cec-conference@concordia.ca>
> Sent: Sunday, February 13, 2005 7:33 PM
> Subject: Re: A one-dimensional universe of sound
>
>
> >A high sheer number of choices is likely to offer more "quality" choices
> >than a
> > small number of choices.
>
> I don't think that's true. Sheer number says nothing about the quality of
> those choices.
>
> > More good is better. More bad is worse.
> > Choice is good.
> > More choice is better, Most choice is best.
>
> But more bad and more good together just makes more same. Nothing has
> changed where it really matters.
>
> > SO, in the case where you have a choice between thousands of
> > possibilities, you
> > may only be "free" to choose 10. But in a case where you have thousands of
> > choices to make, your freedom is temporarily limited to making choices.
> >
> > I would choose less choices and have a large number of options than more
> > choices involving few options. With less work to do, I will then increase
> > my
> > freedom.
>
> Of course there are more than the two directions you give, Nick:
> Less choices+more options
> More choices+less options
>
> But also
> More choices+more options
> Less choices+less options
>
> And don't forget
> Same choices+more or less options
> Same options+more or less choices.
>
> Ouch! Does it all matter? Frankly, yes. And no... But the others each have
> something to say about how we live in the world. Pure Options have
> increased, some new, some still impractical. Some become useful, some
> actually become less useful, for various technical or cultural reasons. I'm
> just saying that we might be better off thinking about the "how" more than
> the "how many".
>
> > And remember: most is best at being more.
>
> But maybe more being is the most best. ;-)
>
> Steve Layton
> http://www.ampcast.com/stevelayton
>

-- 



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