Re: Solo ea


Subject: Re: Solo ea
From: Kevin Austin (kevin.austin@videotron.ca)
Date: Fri Feb 11 2005 - 19:52:03 EST


>Starting at the top... God is for some an experience, for others an article
>of faith, for me both.

Hmmm .... the premise seems to call for an analysis.

Did Goedel know more philosophy than Buddha?

At 09:45 -0500 2005/02/11, gogins@pipeline.com wrote:
>Goedel without question knew more philosophy than Aristotle, because
>his logic was better, and logic is at the heart of philosophy
>because it informs possibility (if it ain't consistent it ain't
>possible), which founds ontology (if it ain't possible it cain't
>exist).

Thank you. This at least (at last) explains why I am not.

My understanding is that "countably infinite" is an oxymoron, perhaps
like describing the ineffable (as distinct from proscribing the
"f"able).

>What we know philosophically more than Aristotle did, is merely that
>although proofs are countably infinite, there are infinitely more
>truths than proofs.

The linguistic failure is that "work of music" has remained undefined
in the proposed analysis. Is it a "work of music" because something
(god or buddha perhaps, or perhaps Sartre, or Beckett) defined it as
such, or because it is labeled as such by a person or people?

>Obviously, if I think that there is something objective in a work of
>music, then it has to have a formal basis, an objective correlative.

  ... and this is (IMV) rather clearly supportive of Eliot's proposed
"post-human" phase of music. The "music" will go on even though there
is no one here (or there) to perceive it. A quick check of Genesis
didn't reveal on which day music was created.

>Indeed, even more importantly, although works of music are of finite
>complexity, the art of music is not complete, and thus must be
>considered as though it might last an infinitely long time.

But god could make it otherwise, as nothing is impossible for god --
but you might have to wait for god ... oh. A return to your original
statement perhaps?

>In other words, if we consider a history of music to consist of an
>infinitely long CD, no such CD and no such history contains all
>possible music.

Best

Kevin



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