Re: Numbers & Gender


Subject: Re: Numbers & Gender
From: Michael Gogins (gogins@pipeline.com)
Date: Thu Jan 13 2005 - 08:34:02 EST


This business about boys drumming and girls singing... that encapsulates
much (not all) of the gender situation in EA.

Pa rum pa pa rum...

Questions:

1. Is it sufficient for girls to be able to learn drumming if they want to?
Even if most won't want to? I believe this is where we are today.

2. If not, how can girls be taught to drum and boys to sing without
oppressing their little minds in a different way?

----- Original Message -----
From: "Kevin Austin" <kevin.austin@videotron.ca>
To: <cec-conference@concordia.ca>
Sent: Thursday, January 13, 2005 7:29 AM
Subject: Re: Numbers & Gender

>
> There may also be the 'definition' aspect of this, not from the gender
> side, but from the 'limits' of electroacoustics (and just when I thought
> it was safe not to get into definitions). This is based upon experience
> here at Concordia.
>
> The ratios in Concordia's "Major in Electroacoustic Studies" are seriously
> male dominated, but these ratios need to be seen in context. (The Minor in
> EaSt has a different ratio.)
>
> While there are only about 70 - 80 students in the Major in EaSt, there
> are probably 500 - 600 (or more) students registered in sound and
> sound-related courses across the university. Ea (or equivalent courses)
> are offered in Journalism, Communication Studies, Film Studies,
> Multi-media, Integrated Media, (the former) Digital Image and Sound, Art
> Education, Open Media, Information Technology ... and this does not
> include students who are taking sound courses for use in other areas
> (sculpture, dance, theater etc).
>
> The range of activities that use the electricity > acoustic energy tool is
> very wide (thus accounting for my personal preference for ea being about
> the transduction of electricity into sound = loudspeaker). Upon leaving
> the Department of Music, the gender ratios change quite a lot, but this is
> because each area is able to cater to different aims and degrees of focus;
> the Major in EaSt is not the only game in town.
>
> While ratios are useful, the context in terms of absolute numbers would
> also be useful (as the Subject is Numbers & Gender, not ratios and
> gender).
>
> For comparison (or not), the jazz vocal area at Concordia (with about 30 -
> 40 students) is 85 - 90% female, while guitar, bass and drums run about
> the same percentage, but inverted.
>
>
>
> Best
>
> Kevin
>



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