Re: Languages and Timbre


Subject: Re: Languages and Timbre
From: macCormac (macCormac@shaw.ca)
Date: Sun Nov 07 2004 - 14:02:18 EST


mais wheat !

monsieur Smalridge trés inspires / esprît la bonny answers via escribé avec la
quests across th waves ? :-O

neigh / NO ? plz do carry on :-)

merci / thank you

macCormac / sylvi.ca
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
reading Gulliver's Travels
via lint-ernet and htmls ;-)

Philippe-Aubert Gauthier wrote:

> >From a little book of 1963 ("La Chaine de Communication Verbale"), I just found
> a section entitled "Sound articulation in French".
>
> Right in the first paragraph there is the definition of the cardinal vowels
> which corresponds to the extremum position of the tongue in mouth (that is the
> position of the back of the tongue, the highest part of it). Max top is called
> closed, max front is called former, max bottom is called opened, max back is
> called later). This is usually used as a reference map (it look like a trapeze,
> sometime called the "vocal trapeze") on which one can draw the various vowels
> for a given language. In the book, the notion of timbre is clearly associated
> with the vowels color and thus to entire mouth position (which lead us toward
> the formants idea).
>
> About various language, it use suggested that even if one may imagine every
> possible combinaison (from the entire set of opened, closed, former, latter,
> "bilabiales", "dentales", ...) of the lips and the tongue positions or
> articulation it still difficult to deal with foreign sounds production because
> each language got his own very strong association between lips/tongue position
> ... its like playing the drums for a first time : all about decentralized
> control of movements. Once its done, you access some new timbres.
>
> So, may I suggest that is not about different timbre but more about a different
> set of timbres.
>
> Bebye,
>
> Selon Louis Dufort <siuol@sympatico.ca>:
>
> > \
> > > I know that timbre is sort of hard to define, but I guess what I am
> > > asking is: Can a person who speaks two languages perfectly(without a
> > > trace of accent) actually be defined as a person who speaks with two
> > > different timbres?
> >
> > Timbre is a big word, I would rather say articulation....
> >
> >
> >
> > Is there more at play then just the way the lips
> > > and tongue form the different words from different languages?
> >
> > IMO. Yes, by imitation, greatly influence by TV. You can notice also
> > imitation between groups of friends. Also I believe that our articulation
> > changes thru life, not just because we are physically changing but also
> > because some of us change their "imitation patterns". A good example of
> > that is when quebecois goes to France and start naturally speaking with a
> > French accent (scary!). Does North Americans start using the English accent
> > when their in great Britain? If not, then one could also conclude that it
> > can also be a culture factor. Some cultures may change more easily than
> > other...?
> >
> >
> > Do the
> > > vocal chords actually change the (I think their called) formants to
> > > achieve different languages?
> >
> > That's a good one. My guest is that our formants patterns are pretty stable
> > (their is limits in changing the physicality of our mouth). Changing
> > drastically formant pattern is the art form of an imitator. I do believe we
> > change our articulation, and very superficially our timbre.
> >
> > > Blah blah blah....
> >
> > Interesting...
> >
> > Au plaisir
> >
> > Louis
> >
> >
> >
>
> %====================================================================%
> % Philippe-Aubert Gauthier, B.Ing, M.Sc. %
> % Étudiant au doctorat en reproduction de champs acoustiques %
> % %
> % GAUS (Groupe d'Acoustique et de vibrations de l'Université de %
> % [ Sherbrooke) %
> % CIRMMT (Centre for Interdisciplinary research in Music, Media %
> % [ and Technology) %
> % %
> % http://www3.sympatico.ca/philippe_aubert_gauthier/acoustics.html %
> %====================================================================%



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