Re: speech, modelling, whither poesie?


Subject: Re: speech, modelling, whither poesie?
gogins@pipeline.com
Date: Sat Jun 05 2004 - 11:40:28 EDT


Nowadays, anyone with a reasonably new personal computer has enough
computer power to do "real computer music", and there are good free
applications in all categories of music production.

This is a completely new situation in the arts, because (a) professional
means of artistic production did not used to be available to the general
public (except writers, actors, and some instrumentalists), and (b) this
particular means of production offers a great deal more power to those who
can program.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Arne Eigenfeldt" <eigenfel@rm-rstar.sfu.ca>
To: <cec-conference@concordia.ca>
Sent: Saturday, June 05, 2004 10:34 AM
Subject: Re: speech, modelling, whither poesie?

>
> On Jun 5, 2004, at 4:52 AM, John Nowak wrote:
>
> > At least with academic computer music, 95% of the composers are
> > mathematicians, electrical engineers, computer scientists, or
> > something similar.
>
> This may have been the case 15 years ago, but I don't think this is the
> case any longer. Look at the program for recent ICMCs, for example, and
> you'll find a younger generation of "composers" who simply use the
> computer as their medium. Gone are the days of the demonstration pieces
> for a given software/hardware, written by the person who created it in
> an often heavy-handed way.
>
> You might even say that some "great" pieces have been created, but
> that's another thread.
>
> :-0
>
>
>

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