Re: Virtual Concerto


Subject: Re: Virtual Concerto
From: Michael Gogins (gogins@pipeline.com)
Date: Wed May 19 2004 - 22:42:15 EDT


Identifying art in an essentialist manner is fraught with consequences.
Duchamp's urinal... is definitely art.

I think however, that for art to be good, it must compel the attention of
the audience and take their imaginations places that they would not
otherwise go.

In the case of the urinal, by itself it obviously has no such power; part of
the work therefore, is the context and presuppositions that Duchamp and what
the audience already knew about him brought along with the porcelain object
into its presentation.

Framing is art. A photograph is a frame on a natural process. A recording of
a natural sound, a cough, a sexual outcry, leaves blowing in the wind, could
be art merely by virtue of being framed in a recording.

If as Aristotle said art is the imitation of nature, then framing nature is
the simplest and most direct form of art.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Michael Rempel" <Michael@VIDIR.COM>
To: <cec-conference@concordia.ca>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2004 2:57 PM
Subject: RE: Virtual Concerto

> > Have you heard any music that doesn't have a sense of human agency?
> >
> > If so, what is it that makes it sound so "non-human-agent"?
> >
>
> I messed with this one for a bit. I stretched the point to see where it
> would go.
>
> My best answer to that question would be the music of the Northern Lights.
>
> I have experienced them while in the far north, and can testify that they
> are psychologically very musical, often 'composing' completely original
> masterworks one after another.
>
> But then is it music if it is not heard, or can not be heard? If it is
heard
> does that mere fact not imply human agency?
>
> Another question... is a message or some kind of intent essential to
music?
> Does it have to 'go some where' or 'do something' identifiable to be
music?
> We have talked about self-referential integrity as a requirement. How far
> can you stretch the point?
>
> To flip that particular coin, what is the new music definition of noise
(non
> musical stuff)?
>
> Regards,
>
> Michael
>



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